Immanuel College wraps up to celebrate Antarctica Day 2021 with flag initiative

Students from Immanuel College are preparing to celebrate Antarctica Day 2021 on 1st December when a flag, designed by Year 7’s Max Diakiw, will have the honour of being showcased by a Researcher in Antarctica.

Each year the UK Polar Network organises for flags that have been designed by children and young people from over 20 countries to be presented by Researchers in Antarctica as part of the Antarctic Flag Initiative, raising awareness of the importance of Antarctica and the Treaty.

Students are tasked with learning all about Antarctica before putting everything they’ve learnt into a creative flag that represents what Antarctica means to them. Miss Lawson, one of the teachers who has been organising this year’s Antarctica Day celebration at Immanuel College, said:

“It’s important that we celebrate Antarctica Day as it commemorates the original 12 nations, including the UK, who signed the Antarctic Treaty on 1st December 1959. The Treaty declared that Antarctica is only to be used for scientific discoveries in a peaceful and collaborative way.

“There are now 54 nations that have signed the Treaty and by celebrating Antarctica Day, we are putting into practice the key values of the agreement. As Antarctica does not have a flag, The UK Polar Network have assigned schools to mark the year by creating a flag to be presented by a Researcher in Antarctica on December 1st. We look forward to seeing pictures of Max Diakiw’s flag with the Researcher in Antarctica.”

Students from different tutor groups came together to learn more about Antarctica before designing their flags, with Max Diakiw’s winning design being chosen by Miss Lawson to be sent to Antarctica.

Jamie-Leigh Milner, from 7CRO, explained why it was important to celebrate Antarctica Day: “It’s important to celebrate Antarctica Day because it shows how everyone signed the Treaty and agreed so that people worldwide can go and make lots of different discoveries.”

7TRF’s Jack Hallas added: “It’s important to have nations working together for peace because then they won’t start wars.”